love

Music as an Escape?

The concept of music as a form of escapism, a doorway out from the mundane and tiring repetitions of modern life, is simply put, a look in the wrong direction. Of course the initial experience of musical creation and the thought of escapism is an attractive feeling. However, when we follow our music away, we create a dichotomy that accepts the daily monotony of our lives rather than invigorating and charging the interactions with our surroundings. Our art then becomes essentially useless, doing nothing to inform our waking reality.

The modern workplace is too often sterile, bound in legal and cultural etiquette, resulting in robotic conversation that is little better than watching television. This sterility acts as a sort of blinders keeping our attention firmly planted on a narrow and unfulfilling objective that serves only to tire our spirit. However, when we bring our art, our philosophy, and our passions to the table our mundane activities and interactions can be colored and invigorated by meaningful conversations and creative approaches to our work environment.

Our history in music has shown us that there is great beauty in repetition. Let us apply this to our everyday lives.

 

Best,

Luke

The Songwriter’s Challenge

So often songwriting becomes the topic of debate in popular music: whether someone writes their own material, how sincere the lyrics are, the musicality, the simplicity, etc. Its an art-form which is so difficult because it is often so simple. It requires mature writing both lyrically and musically without relying on virtuosity or intellectualism. All that counts is its connection with the listener. However, because of the art-form’s starkness it can often be twisted by aesthetics, sexuality or any marketing tactics meant to draw in the audience while detracting from the musical expression. Also, because songwriting is such a large part of our entertainment industry you often have to question whether a song is stuck in your head because it the result of a formula that is being pushed out like a factory product or whether it really means something to you as a sincere expression. Take Bruno Mars for example; I recently heard a girl say, “he gets it, he knows what girls want to hear.” But does he get it or does some musician on the label’s payroll get it. When it really comes down to it, does that even matter?

Some would obviously say that a song’s origin doesn’t really matter but rather the meaning that each person derives from it. I say “bullshit.” I would like to think that when I buy something, it is a quality product and not something that breaks down after I take it out of its deceivingly well packaged box. In addition, it’s more than an annoyance that generations are fed some of the trends that corporate interests think will make them the most money.

Now, for some true songwriting: Dink’s Song – First recorded in the early 1900’s.

Music is love in search of a word.

— Sidney Lanier from wikipedia

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