Monthly Archives: May 2012

Paper Note

Paper Note creates a tangible waveform from laser cut disks of paper. The user records a message, a sound or loads up music, and the system analyses the sound to map each moment to a corresponding slice.

Paper Note is a project made by Andrew Nip at CIID.  The software that he developed creates a real-life representation of a waveform for any specified sound file. Each Paper Note is made up of about 450 stacked paper disks, each representing the volume of the waveform at a particular “slice” of time (think samples).  The resulting piece is about 14cm in length.

The software was programmed in Processing, and uses a laser cutter to cut the disks.  See it in action in this video.

Too bad I didn’t have a laser cutter – these look absolutely stunning as works of art.  That being said, Andrew is offering to cut the paper if you send him the sound file.

Synth swimwear

Etsy user PussPuss has created a swimsuit collection called “DJ’s wife” which features prints of revered synths and other music making gear.  Some of the gear featured includes:

– Alesis Ion
– Roland TB303
– Roland TR909
– Roland TR606
– Nord Lead
– 2 DJ Mixers
– Akai APK40
– Technics 1210er Turntable

She sells them for $98 each. These are fantastic, I just wish she made some TB303 pants for guys.

Relive the glory days with 808 posters

Rob Ricketts is a graphic designer currently living and working in Birmingham, England. Rob has designed four fantastic posters depicting famous Roland Tr-808 drum machine lines from classic 80’s tracks.

Each drum pattern sequence has been analyzed and represented to give a great visual interpretation of the patterns. Sadly, Rob is sold out of the prints, but we are in contact with Rob and will update this post if they become available once again. Since I grew up with a lot of this music (and I actually own an 808), I’d love to have one of these for myself.

The tunes represented are:

Afrika Bambaataa – Planet Rock
Cybotron – Clear
A Guy Called Gerald – Voodoo Ray
Adonis – No Way Back

Check out the posters:

 

Cry Baby: The pedal that rocks the world

Joey Tosi’s Cry Baby: The Pedal That Rocks The World is a documentary about the wah wah pedal. This awesome documentary should appeal to just about everyone – especially guitar players.

Cry Baby: The Pedal That Rocks The World tells the story of the wah wah effect pedal, from its invention in 1966 to the present day. Musicians, engineers, and historians discuss the impact of the pedal on popular music and demonstrate the various ways it has been used, as well as how its evolution has improved the ability of artists to express themselves musically. The film features interviews with Brad Plunkett, the inventor of the pedal, plus many other musical luminaries such as Ben Fong-Torres, Eddie Van Halen, Slash, Buddy Guy, Art Thompson, Eddie Kramer, Kirk Hammett, Dweezil Zappa, and Jim Dunlop. These professionals explain how a musical novelty transcended convention and has become timelessly woven into the fabric of modern pop-culture.”

Here is the video in it’s entirety.  Enjoy!

Pee guitar: The urinal for guitar players

Only in Brazil will you find a bathroom at a bar called “aurora”, where a urinal is rigged up with a device that lets you play guitar while you are… umm… relieving yourself.

Here’s a news clip on the urinal in action:

And just for fun, here are a few audio clips of it in use, just try not to think about the “making of” each one while it’s playing:

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

Audio clip: Adobe Flash Player (version 9 or above) is required to play this audio clip. Download the latest version here. You also need to have JavaScript enabled in your browser.

A canyon of sound: How stereo vinyl works (1958)

RCA Victor introduces “a miracle,” their Orthophonic, high-fidelity, home stereo sound system.

Bob Banks, RCA Victor marketing manager of radio sales and their Victrola division, introducing the RCA’s new “living stereo” records and stereophonic hi-fi gear in 1958.

The demonstration utilizes left and right-hand sections of orchestra married together to create the fullness of “living stereo” and gives you a stereo stylus’s POV as it travels across a record groove (“a canyon of sound!”). If you are a vinyl fan, it’s pretty fun and informative.

So, put on your saturday night suit, and get down – get groovy – with “living stereo”.

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